C/O BUHS, 125/1 Darussalam Road, Mirpur, Dhaka-1216, Bangladesh
+8801710-972498

Parallel Session F: Noncomunicable Diseases

4th Septermber, 2021.  

11.00 AM to 01.00 PM

Join the Session

NEED HELP? 

Call +8801710972498

Chair


Prof. Sharmeen Yasmeen BIO

Head, Dept. of Community Medicine, Bangladesh Medical College &

Immediate Past Chairperson, Public Health Foundation of Bangladesh

Co-Chair


Prof. MSA Mansur Ahmed BIO

Dean, School of Health Sciences,

Professor, Dept. of NCD, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences&

Vice-Chairperson, Public Health Foundation of Bangladesh

Moderator


Prof. Saidur Rahman Mashreky BIO

Dept. of Noncommunicable Disease, Bangladesh University of Health

Sciences & Director, Public Health Sciences, CIPRB

11:07 AM to 11:14 AM

Muhammad Tareque Hasan

MPH Student, University of Eastern Finland

Finland

Leisure time physical activity and mortality in hypertensives: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD)

View Abstract

Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality in Hypertensive: The Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD) 


Muhammad Tareque Hasan, 

Professor Arja Erkkila, Professor Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen University of Eastern Finland 


Background: Physical inactivity is one of the most important modifiable risk factors of heart disease. According to WHO, adequate physical activity can reduce the cardiovascular mortality rate by 65%. Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular disease with a 31.1% worldwide prevalence in the adult population. This study aimed to investigate leisure time physical activity associates with the cardiovascular mortality rate in subjects with hypertension. Method: The current analysis is the population-based prospective cohort study, the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, which was carried out in 1939 male participants aged 42 to 60 years that participated in the baseline examinations from 1984 to 1989. Physical activity was measured by a self-administered questionnaire. Hypertension diagnosis was based on self-informed hypertension, use of hypertension medication, or blood pressure measurement at entry. Mortality data were collected from the national death registry of Finland by register linkage. Follow-up was from study entry to the end of 2018. Result: In general, more than 606 minutes/week (>10 hours/week) of total leisure time physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular death in hypertensive men (HR=0.75, 95%CI 0.59 to 0.94, P=0.01). It is suggested, doing jogging between 30-40 minutes/week reduces cardiovascular mortality (HR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.24 to 1.07, P=0.07), in addition to the borderline result with modest jogging, It's been observed that gardening at a high level increased the chance of CVD death (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.97 to 1.80, P=0.07). Swimming at a moderate intensity increases cardiovascular disease mortality, which was statistically significant (HR:1.53, 95% CI: 1.04 to 2.24, P=0.03). Other than, moderate level of swimming none of the different types of leisure time physical activities were statistically significant. Conclusion: In hypertensive men, a high degree of overall leisure time physical activity is associated with a lower mortality rate from cardiovascular disease in middle-aged eastern Finnish men. 

Key words: Physical exertion, exercise, Mortality, Hypertension, Cardiovascular disease

11:15 AM to 11:22 AM

Md Shehab Uddin Al Abid

Department of Epidemiology and Research, National Heart Foundation Hospital and Research Institute,

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Distribution and prevalence of lipid abnormalities among adult population in Bangladesh: evidence from nationally representative STEPS survey-2018

View Abstract

Distribution and prevalence of lipid abnormalities among adult population in Bangladesh: evidence from nationally representative STEPS survey-2018 


Md Shehab Uddin Al Abid, Md Mostafa Monower, Sohel Reza Choudhury 

Department of Epidemiology and Research, National Heart Foundation Hospital and Research Institute, Dhaka, Bangladesh 


Background: Lipid abnormalities, either singly or in combination, such as high total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, elevated triglyceride (TG) and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, are one of the major risk factors for different non-communicable diseases. There is no existing literature showing the distribution of abnormal lipid profiles among the Bangladeshi general adult population. Objectives: Therefore, we aimed to determine the prevalence and distribution of different types of lipid abnormality among the adult population of Bangladesh. Method: We utilized the latest National STEPS Survey for NCD Risk Factors in Bangladesh-2018 data for our study. Our primary outcome was the mean of lipid components, prevalence and co-existence of different lipid abnormalities. Data were weighted appropriately, and all analysis was completed using STATA-16. Result: The mean (SE) mg/dL levels of various lipids in the population were as follows: Total Cholesterol 171.2 (0.8), Serum Triglyceride 141.3 (1.6), Serum LDL-C 103.8 (0.6), Serum HDL-C 39.1 (0.3), and Total-HDL cholesterol ratio 4.5 (0.03). Overall, prevalence of dyslipidemia in the population was 76.4%. Prevalence of different lipid abnormalities in the Bangladeshi population was as follows: low HDL-C 61.8% ; Hypertriglyceridemia 34.7%, High total-HDL cholesterol ratio 31.6%, Hypercholesterolemia 19.7% and Elevated LDL-C 18.9%. Women had a higher prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and elevated LDL-C than men, p<0.01. In the contrary, men had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-C, p<0.01. The Urban population were more likely to have lipid abnormalities than the rural population, p<0.05. Also, a rising trend in lipid abnormalities was observed with increasing age except hypertriglyceridemia in men, where the highest abnormality (47%) was found among 30-39 years. Conclusion: Our study provides evidence of a higher prevalence of different lipid abnormalities among the adult population in Bangladesh. As three out of every four individuals in Bangladesh have at least one lipid abnormality, public health initiatives are immediately required in Bangladesh. 

Key words: Lipid Abnormalities, Mean Lipid components, STEPS Survey Bangladesh, Non Communicable Disease.

11:23 AM to 11:30 AM

Esrat Jahan

Macquarie University,

Australia

The role of smart phone applications in preventing Type 2 diabetes

View Abstract

The role of smart phone applications in preventing Type 2 diabetes 


Esrat Jahan1, Rawan Al Mansour2, Leticia Bezerra3, Dr Rimante Ronto1, Dr Kiran Ijaz4, Dr Liliana Laranjo3 

1Macquarie University, 2King Faisal University, 3University of Sydney, 4Australian Institute of Health Innovation 


Introduction: Type 2 diabetes is becoming a major public health concern in developed and developing nations. Mobile health applications are becoming a popular technological intervention in helping prevent diabetes by promoting a healthier lifestyle; however, not much is known about this intervention's efficacy and user perspectives. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of mobile apps in improving health outcomes among people with the risk of developing diabetes and to gain understanding user perspective about these apps. Methods: Studies were searched in four databases and included if they involved adults at high risk of developing diabetes and had a mobile app as an intervention to promote physical activity, healthy diet and weight loss and improve clinical outcomes. Qualitative methods were used in exploring the user experience of mobile apps. After screening 936 articles, 13 experimental, one qualitative and one mixed study were included. Results: All except one RCT were conducted in developed countries and two studies included people from ethnic minorities. Study duration ranged from two to 12 months. The feature of tracking weight, diet and physical activity was most common, present in 12 studies. 13 studies showed results that using mobile apps reduced weight among participants in the intervention group with statistically significant results. A reduction in BMI was also reported in seven studies. Only two out of seven studies showed a statistically significant decrease in blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels. Results from the qualitative studies highlighted the need for the personalisation of mobile apps. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic review evaluating mobile apps' efficacy and user perspectives in promoting healthier lifestyle behaviours to prevent type 2 diabetes. Mobile apps seem to have a promising effect on the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Further research needs to be done in developing nations with a longer follow-up duration. More qualitative studies would contribute to better versions of apps. 

Key words: Smart phone, App, Type-2 diabetes

11:31 AM to 11:38 AM

Afifa Anjum

Department of Public Health and Informatics,

Jahangirnagar University

Prevalence of and Factors Associated with Mental Health Disorders among Urban, Semi-urban and Rural School Adolescents in Dhaka, Bangladesh

View Abstract

Prevalence of and factors associated with mental health disorders among urban, semi-urban and rural school adolescents in Dhaka, Bangladesh 


Afifa Anjum, Md. Tajuddin Sikder 

Department of Public Health and Informatics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342


Background: Due to the change in physiology, psychology and emotion, adolescents are at greater risks of developing mental health disorders. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and factors associated with common mental health disorders (depression, anxiety and stress) among urban, semi-urban and rural school adolescents in Dhaka district of Bangladesh. Methods: A cross-sectional study, following mixed-method approach, was conducted between January 2019 and February 2020. Quantitative data were collected from a representative sample of 2313 school adolescents in Dhanmondi (urban area), Savar (semi-urban area) and Dhamrai (rural area) of Dhaka district through face-to-face interviews by using a pre-developed semi-structured questionnaire. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 key informants, prominent mental health researchers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists in Bangladesh. Results: Of the participants of this study, 40.9% were suffering from poor overall wellbeing. The prevalence of moderate to severe depression, anxiety and stress among the school adolescents was 19.8%, 20.1%, and 73.5%, respectively. In all cases, female adolescents and urban adolescents were the worst sufferers (p<0.001). Lifestyle-related factors, such as being physically inactive, social media use, >2 hours screen time, daily sleep dissatisfaction, body image dissatisfaction, were associated with poor overall wellbeing, depression, anxiety, and stress among adolescents. Furthermore, the key informants reported that there are some familial, educational and societal as well as governmental issues responsible for mental health disorders such as, negative parenting, lack of empathy from teachers and peers, stigma in society and community, and absence of proper adolescent-friendly interventions triggered the mental health disorders of school adolescents. Conclusion: This study shows a high prevalence of common mental health disorders as well as the associated factors among school adolescents of urban, semi-urban and rural regions of Dhaka district in Bangladesh. Urgent initiatives should be undertaken by families, educational institutions, society, communities and, most importantly, the government of Bangladesh to curb the prevalence of common mental health disorders among school adolescents of urban, semi-urban and rural regions of the country. 

Key words : School adolescents, mental wellbeing, depression, anxiety, stress, Bangladesh

11:39 AM to 11:46 PM

Dr. Fardina Rahman Omi

Department of NCD,

Bangladesh University of Health Sciences

Dementia Risk and Its Associated Risk Factors Among Coronary Artery Disease Patients Attending a Tertiary Cardiac Hospital of Dhaka City

View Abstract

Dementia Risk and Its Associated Risk Factors Among Coronary Artery Disease Patients Attending a Tertiary Cardiac Hospital of Dhaka City 


Dr. Fardina Rahman Omi1 Dr. Lingkan Barua1 Palash Chandra Banik1, Dr. Syed Mosfiqur Rahman2, Dr. Mithila Faruque1 

1Department of NCD, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, 2Department of Cardiac Surgery, Ibrahim Cardiac Hospital and Research Institute, Dhaka 


Background: The effect of coronary artery disease (CAD) on the future development of dementia is not well studied worldwide. Objective: This study aimed to predict the risk of developing dementia in established CAD patients using a mobile application based risk prediction tool, namely "Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging, and Incidence of Dementia" (CAIDE) risk score and also identified risk factors associated with those patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 280 stable CAD patients aged 40-59 years who were admitted for coronary revascularization at Ibrahim Cardiac Hospital and Research Institute, a tertiary cardiac hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The risk of future dementia (20-years later) was determined using a CAIDE risk score that ranges from 0-15. The risk was categorized as low (0-5)', 'moderate (6-7)' and 'high (8- 15)' Results: CAIDE risk score application among the 280 participants showed, 30.7% had high-risk, 32.9% had moderate-risk, and 36.4% had a low-risk of developing dementia. Total nine factors were identified which showed high-odds (>1) compare to low-risk groups like, smokeless tobacco (moderate-risk, OR 1.134; high- risk, OR 1.1546), duration of added salt intake (moderate-risk, OR 1.917; high-risk, OR 1.054), duration of diabetes (moderate-risk, OR 1.089; high-risk, OR 1.024), HbA1C (high-risk, OR 1.364) LDL-C level (moderate- risk, OR 1.012; high-risk, OR 1.027), ) HDL-C level (moderate-risk, OR 1.054; high-risk, OR 1.071), ) TG level (moderate-risk, OR 1.011; high-risk, OR 1.003), urea (moderate-risk, OR 1.022; high-risk, OR 1.023) and ejection fraction (moderate-risk, OR 1.054). Conclusion: Current study identified that more than half of the CAD patients are at risk of dementia development associated with several risk factors like use of smokeless tobacco, duration of added salt intake, duration of diabetes mellitus, high LDL-C level, low HDL-C level, high TG level, and high urea. A large-scale prospective cohort study can clarify current findings more precisely and know the disease's demesne. 

Key words: Risk of dementia, coronary artery disease, risk factors, CAIDE risk score

11:47 AM to 11:54 PM

Sahadat Hossain

Department of Public Health and Informatics,

Jahangirnagar University

Adoption of Tobacco Retail License in Bangladesh: Exploring Possible Outcomes and Implementation Challenges

View Abstract

Adoption of Tobacco Retail License in Bangladesh: Exploring Possible Outcomes and Implementation Challenges 


Sahadat Hossain 

Department of Public Health and Informatics, Jahangir Nagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 


Background: The objective of this study was to explore the possible outcomes of adoption of tobacco retail license (TRL) in Bangladesh and the likely challenges in implementing this measure. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between March and November of 2018 to collect data from a representative sample of 472 tobacco retailers in Dhaka city through face-to-face interviews by using a semi-structured questionnaire. In addition, 24 Key Informant Interviews (KII) were conducted among the policy makers and tobacco control advocates. Results: The study found that general stores, departmental stores and super shops were the most common types of retailers selling tobacco products. Smoking tobacco was the top-selling product in the majority of the retail outlets, and loose cigarette selling was high. About half of the retailers reported that the selling tobacco products was an important part of their business. About 80% of the retailers reported that they would support TRL scheme and it was found significantly associated with their educational qualification (p< 0.05). The majority of the retailers indicated they would apply to obtain tobacco retail licensing if it was adopted in Bangladesh. Besides, the majority of the retailers (85%) agreed that TRL would secure their business. The key informants were supportive of the mandatory TRL; however, they believed that the government would face some challenges such as proper legislation and implementation strategies and political will while implementing this licensing. Almost all participants agreed that it would prevent illegal tobacco sales, sell tobacco products to minors, restrict the location for tobacco retailing, and help monitor compliance of tobacco selling effectively. Conclusions: The study findings indicate that introducing TRL could be an effective initiative in comprehensive tobacco control. Incorporating a tobacco retail licensing provision within a comprehensive tobacco control policy is necessary to restrict the widespread availability of tobacco products. 

Key words: Tobacco Retailing, Tobacco Retail License, Tobacco Control Policy, Bangladesh

11:55 AM to 12:02 PM

Dr. Farzana Begum

Health System & Population Studies Division,

icddr,b

Deaths from non-communicable diseases among slum dwellers and their socio-demographic correlates

View Abstract

Deaths from non-communicable diseases among slum dwellers and their socio-demographic correlates 


Dr. Farzana Begum1, Dr. Daniel2, D. Reidpath2, Shakera Naima1 

1UHDSS, icddrb, 

2HSPSD, icddr,b 


Background: NCDs are responsible for 41 million deaths annually, accounting for 71% of all deaths worldwide, majority of the deaths (47% of NCD deaths) in low- and middle-income countries. Rapid urbanization in Bangladesh brings with it the increased risks of NCDs. Approximately 55% of the urban population live in urban slums and lack essential urban utilities, placing them at risk of developing and suffering from infectious and non- communicable diseases. Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify the incidence of NCD deaths and the association of socio demographic factors among the adults of urban slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Methods: Data from 51,720 individuals of five slums aged 18 to 80 from the icddrb's Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System (UHDSS) for the period of January 2019 to April 2021 were used. We focused major non-communicable illnesses mortality: cancer, stroke, asthma/COPD, heart disease and diabetes (WHO definition). Total 1020 deaths were recorded with NCDs accounting for 53.73% of deaths. Therefore, the sample size reduces to 548 NCDs death and disease for advanced analysis. Data were collected through face to face interview of the household members through non-verbal autopsy methods. Results: NCDs accounting for 53.73% of deaths, male accounted for 60% and female 40%. Majority of deaths were between 50 and 59 years old (26%) while 5% to 9 % under 39. Types of NCDs deaths varied significantly (p<0.05) by slums, age at death, sex, occupation, wealth index, land owner ship and the duration of living in the slums. NCDs deaths were 4.08 to 6.7 times higher among respondents with increased age 18-29. People over 70 had a 12.5 (95 percent CI, 3.81-41.03) greater risk of dying from NCDs. Surprisingly the odds of dying from NCDs were 7.81 times greater in those aged 60-69 than in the other age groups (95 % CI, 2.48-24.59). Conclusion: NCD mortality is prevalent in urban slums. Youth are also at risk. socio-demographics affect NCD deaths. NCD should be included in urban health strategies for slum dwellers in Bangladesh. 

Key words: NCDs, Socio-demographics

12:03 PM to 12:10 PM

Dr. Sarmin Sultana

National Heart Foundation Hospital and Research Institute

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Hypertension detection, treatment and control rates in urban slum population in Bangladesh

View Abstract

Hypertension detection, treatment and control rates in urban slum population in Bangladesh 


Sarmin Sultana1, Sohel Reza Choudhury1, Abubakr Ahmed Abdullah Al-Shoaibi2, Mohammad Khalequzzaman3, Mohammad Abdullah Al Mamun1, Chifa Chiang2, Hiroshi Yatsuya4, Atsuko Aoyama2 

1Department of Epidemiology and Research, National Heart Foundation Hospital and Research Institute Bangladesh, 

2Department of Public Health and Health Systems, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan, 

3Department of Public Health and Informatics Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Bangladesh, 

4Department of Public Health Fujita Health University School of Medicine Japan 


Background: Hypertension is responsible for 13% of global deaths, where low- and middle-income countries account for the majority of hypertension disease burden. In Bangladesh, the prevalence of hypertension is also increasing especially in urban dwellers. The poor community living in the urban slum are particularly vulnerable to suffering from uncontrolled hypertension complications due to their limited access to basic healthcare services. Objectives: This study aimed to obtain information on hypertension prevalence, its detection, treatment and control rates among the dwellers of a selected slum in the capital city of Bangladesh. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the residents of the selected slum aged 18-64 years. Stratified random sampling was applied to select an equal number of men and women. Blood pressure was measured using an automatic digital sphygmomanometer. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg or on any antihypertensive drug. Results: A total of 2009 participants (1008 men and 1001 women) were included in the study. The prevalence of hypertension was 20.3% (18.6% men and 20.6% women). Among all the participants, 47.7% of men and 11.7% of women stated that they have never had their blood pressure measured in the past. Among those who had BP measured in the past, 15.9% were informed that they have hypertension. About 53% of the hypertensive detected during the survey were not detected earlier by any physician or health care worker. Around 55% of known hypertensive patients were taking antihypertensive medication while 43.6% had their blood pressure controlled. Conclusion: The study revealed that a large proportion of hypertensive in the urban community are undetected while treatment and control rates are also low. 

Key words: Hypertension, Urban, Slum, Bangladesh

12:11 PM to 12:18 PM

Dr. Mahfuja Luna

Department of Epidemiology,

National Institute of Preventive and Social Medicine (NIPSOM)

Sleep Quality and Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

View Abstract

Sleep quality and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus 


Dr. Mahfuja Luna, Fahmida Akter 

Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Preventive & Social Medicine 


Background: Diabetes Mellitus, one of the most alarming non-communicable diseases has become the global and local public health emergency of twenty-first century. Studies conducted in HICs suggest that good glycemic control is positively associated with the quality of sleep. There is no such data for LMICs as well as Bangladesh Objectives: This study was aimed to find the relationship between sleep quality and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Diabetic Association Medical College Hospital, Faridpur. Purposively, 185 type 2 diabetic patients were interviewed with a semi-structured pre-tested Bengali questionnaire. The physical findings of the participants (height and weight) were documented. Their medical records were reviewed to assess glycemic control, treatment modalities and other co-morbidities. The sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scale. A global PSQI score above five, differentiated poor from good sleepers. Data were analyzed for appropriate descriptive and inferential statistics by IBM SPSS V. 25. Result: Mean age of the respondents was 60.63 ±10.34 (SD) years. More than half of the respondents were female (56.2%). About 43.8% of the respondents were obese according to Asian BMI, and 75.1% of respondents never smoked. More than half of the respondents (55.1%) had a positive family history of diabetes mellitus. The average duration of diabetes was 6.88 ±4.43 (SD) years. Half of the respondents (50.8%) were on both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agent, and the majority (78.4%) claimed to take medications regularly. More than half (64.9%) had poor glycemic control (HbA1c≥7%). Poor glycemic control was significantly associated with sex of the respondents (p=0.01), employment status (p<0.05), treatment modalities for type 2 diabetes mellitus (p=0.01) and sleep duration (p<0.001). However, glycemic control was significantly associated with the regular taking of medication and sleep quality in the multivariate regression analysis. Good glycemic control was about 12 times more common among those who had a good quality of sleep than those who had not (aOR 12.66: 95% CI: 6.02-26.59; p<0.001). Conclusion: This study revealed that sleep quality is associated with glycemic control, which needs further evaluation. Attention needs to be given to improving sleep quality and maintaining good glycemic control to reduce complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. 

Key words: Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, T2DM, Sleep Quality

12:19 PM to 12:26 PM

Partha Sarathi Datta

Department of Public Health Research,

Rural & Urban Social Welfare Organization, West Bengal, India

Prevalence and Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome among Rural Indian Adults

View Abstract

Prevalence and risk factors of metabolic syndrome among rural Indian adults 


Partha Sarathi Datta 

Department of Public Health Research, Rural & Urban Social Welfare Organization,West Bengal, India 


Background : Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a bunch of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease,stroke, diabetes etc. and major causes of death and disability globally. Objective: To find out the prevalence and associated risk factors among rural adults of India. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among 582 rural adults aged 30 to 60 years in WestBengal, India. Anthropometric measurements, such as stature, body weight, circumferences at mid-arm, minimum waist and maximum hip and four major skinfolds, were measured using standard methodology. Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-Hip Ratio (WHR) were calculated using a standard formula. Systolic (SBP) & Diastolic (DBP) blood pressure and fasting blood glucose were measured from each participant. A schedule was used to collect data on the socio-economic profile, behavioral activity, physicalactivity, family history of MetS and weekly consumption of food. Results: The male participants have higher mean values of BMI and WHR, but no significant sex differenceis observed for SBP and DBP. Mean values of blood glucose are slightly higher among female participants.The family history of hypertension, physical inactivity and faulty food habits were found to be significant association with blood pressure and blood glucose among the participants. The prevalence of MetS was 41.3% (38.9% among males and 45.2% among females) among participants.The prevalence of central obesity elevated fasting blood glucose and raised blood pressure were 61.3%, 38.2%, and 42.7%, respectively among participants. Conclusions: The study showed that the prevalence of MetS and other related risk factors were high amongrural participants of studied area. Prevention should begin during early ages in life, when a modification in lifestyle can reduce the incidence of MetS. 

Key words: Metabolic Syndrome, MetS risk factors, Rural Indians.

12:26 PM to 12:46 PM

Q/A Session

12:47 PM to 01:00 PM

Sum up by the Chair and Co-Chair

Troubleshooting

If you face problems to join the session please call +8801714245384 at Whatsapp